The Moment I Realized I’m Disabled……

Before we get into our topic of the day, I need to offer a caveat: The following entry is based solely on my experience and does not reflect the entire disabled population as a whole. I offer these insights in hopes of helping others that are going through a tough time that can be jarring and very confusing.



I didn’t realize I was disabled until I was 16 years old. Seriously.

The fact that I was born with Spina-Bifida makes that last statement seem completely illogical.

But it’s true. Let me explain.

I grew up the youngest of 3 in the late ’70s in a small town in the Midwest. Being that my sisters were both completely able-bodied and our town was small, I was normally the only person in a wheelchair and braces around. When I was really little I was able to get around with just braces.

My parents worked hard to treat me just like my other siblings. I had chores around the house and would get in trouble if my assigned tasks weren’t done.

In school I was mainstreamed into a regular classroom, and taken out only for short times for physical and occupational therapy. Those were the only times I was treated different from my classmates. I was also the only disabled student in my kindergarten, elementary and middle school.

It’s a funny thing; being a kid. You don’t think much about the future. And when you do, sometimes elements of the life you have are different in the future imagined.

And so it wasn’t until I was 16 and in high school that I had the realization that I had a disability. And there was nothing I could do to ever change that.

Whoa. Heavy stuff.

There was definitely an exact moment this hit me. And it felt like a ton of bricks (I know this is a over-used colloquialism, but in this case it’s the truth). So how did I get through this and come out stronger on the other side? I’m glad you asked:

1. Know that verbally saying it aloud helps you to accept it. Writing it down in a journal can also be cathartic.

2. Seek professional help-This was the best thing that I was able to do with the help of my parents. It was also during this time that we discovered I had been living with a chemical imbalance, causing depression, for a long time prior to this experience.

There is no shame in seeking outside help.

3. To your parents-listen to your child. It may seem strange that they are just now coming to terms with reality, but hearing their words and validating their feelings will go a long way towards healing.

4. Take a day-Again, this realization can be quite jarring. Taking a day to reflect and get your head together might be a helpful technique. I know for myself that taking a day off school helped me to focus and get my head back together.

You can and will get through this. And come out stronger on the other side.

I’m pulling for you

 

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3 thoughts on “The Moment I Realized I’m Disabled……

  1. No, it’s not weird to not “notice” that you’re disabled until 16. I think I was 17 when I had to write a note to each of my teachers requesting accommodations; one foolish teacher couldn’t handle her class and didn’t bother writing the assignments down on the board. Even then, I didn’t think of myself as disabled and was shocked when I flunked out of interpreting class that my teacher said I was failing “due to a disability” in college. As a kid I expected to be able to do anything; I don’t think that the teachers saying that realized that it wasn’t helpful. I was a parent before I realized that I was disabled; not just “had a hearing loss.”

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Disability exists much more in the eye, and mind of the beholder.

    I was born with dwarfism, and raised to do my chores like my able-bodied siblings. As I grew older, I too realized I had a disability, was different, only when I interacted with society. Eventually, I realized that society sucks, way more than my disability does. What I say to make myself feel better is: SOCIETY SUCKS!

    Liked by 1 person

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